Seok Kim, a postdoc in Professor Nicholas Fang’s lab, holds up a 3-D-printed porous substrate that could be used as a catalytic reactor to remove toxic gases in cars and power plants. Associate Professor Xuanhe Zhao and PhD candidate Hyunwoo Yuk use 3-D printing technologies to create complex 3-D structures. Here, a polymer scaffold ink is being printed on a silicon wafer to provide structural support for other ink materials with poorer printability during the 3-D printing process. This scaffold ink can be washed away after printing, leaving a complex 3-D structure made of hard-to-print materials. Each component of this three-piece assembly of MIT’s Building 10 dome was printed using a different commercial additive manufacturing process. The piece was modeled after an original design by Ely Sachs and Michael Cima after their invention of binder jet printing. Associate Professor John Hart speaks with graduate student David Griggs in front of his lab’s custom-built selective laser melting system. In the system, a laser is precisely scanned over metal powder, melting the powder to form a 3-D part layer by layer. 3-D-printed objects related to Professor John Hart’s research includin...