Everything that works with Amazon Echo and Alexa: the best Amazon Alexa-compatible devices of 2019

By clicking one of our links you’re supporting our labs and our independence, as we may earn a small share of revenue. Recommendations are separate from any business incentives. This guide has been updated to include more Echo devices, many new products with Alexa built in, and products that work with Alexa via Alexa Skills. Amazon has steadily become the hottest name in smart home products on the market the retail giant unveiled the Echo smart speaker in 2014. Suddenly, every tech company wants to integrate its products with Amazon’s customizable virtual assistant, Alexa. The integrations keep coming, at such a pace that it can be hard to know exactly which products work with Alexa. Amazon’s website tries to keep on top of things, but its interface can be tough to navigate. It also (understandably) underplays the fact that you don’t need an Echo to take advantage of Alexa and all the devices she can control. Not only has Amazon built Alexa into other products, like the all new Echo Plus, Echo Show 5, and the Fire HD 10 tablet, but the company has also allowed third-party hardware makers to build Alexa into their own devices, even letting Ford build the a...

Now that most incandescent lightbulbs are pretty much a thing of the past, consumers now must

Now that most incandescent lightbulbs are pretty much a thing of the past, consumers now must choose between LED (light-emitting diode), CFL (compact fluorescent), and halogen bulbs to light their homes. But which is the best option? It all depends on your needs. We’ll take you through the various kinds of lighting, the benefits that each offers, and help you find the best light bulb for you. Traditional incandescent bulbs measured their brightness in watts; if you wanted a brighter bulb, you bought one with a higher wattage. However, with the advent of LEDs and other types of lighting, that yardstick has become meaningless, and as a result, a bulb’s brightness is now listed as lumens, which is a more accurate measurement of how bright it is, rather than how much energy it consumes. Below is a conversion table which shows how much energy, in watts, an incandescent bulb and an LED typically require to produce the same amount of light. Other replacement lightbulb choices consume more power than LED bulbs and have shorter rated-lifespans, but cost much less upfront. A 60-watt–equivalent CFL bulb from Philips, for example, consumes 13 watts and has a rated lifetime of 12,000 h...